Supply chain

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Buyers keep pushing for improved cold chain management in the flower industry

The European flower industry is increasingly realising the full impact of effective cold chain management – and the risks of deficiencies in this key area. Better cold chain management, to them, means higher quality, less risk, less waste and more profit. Demand for cold chain protocols and service level agreements is growing. Particular supermarkt chains, whose role will continue to grow, are doing tests and developing new and higher standards themselves. They are changing the very nature of flower trading by introducing closed supply chains involving just the growers and themselves. Continue reading

Assess, benchmark and optimise your cold chain performance with FlowerWatch and Hortiwise

happycustomersSatisfied customers and optimised profits are within the reach of every player in fresh flower supply chains around the world. The key is uncompromising cold chain management. FlowerWatch, in cooperation with Hortiwise, has developed a method of using that key to perfection.

The result: optimised supply chains, guaranteed vase life or shelf life extension by several days, satisfied customers, an improved branch image and, of course, maximum profitability.
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Kenyan-Dutch flower supply chain prepares for overhaul

A Dutch government-funded study of the Kenyan-Dutch cut flower supply chain exposed a host of minor and major bottlenecks and inefficiencies – and kick-started sector-wide involvement in setting new industry standards for quality, cost efficiency and sustainability.

Businesses operating in the Kenyan-Dutch cut flower supply chain will continue meeting with government agencies and trade promotion specialists from the two countries in the next few months to tackle a host of minor and major inefficiencies and bottlenecks hindering further growth. These so-called Platform Discussions, initiated by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation, are the result of a recent in-depth study of this supply chain. The aim of both the study and the meetings is to lift the Kenyan-Dutch cut flower supply chain to a higher level, setting new standards for the entire horticultural sector. The result, if the plan succeeds, will be reduced supply chain costs, a longer vase life for flowers and therefore increased value-for-money for consumers, and increased sustainability in terms of a lighter carbon footprint and reduced product and packaging wastage.

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